Gina Sikora

Home

Music

Languages

TC3

Medieval Studies

Vita

Languages

FOREIGN LANGUAGE RESOURCES INDEX

LANGUAGE, CULTURE, & RESOURCE LINKS

Index:

Links:

Spanish Language & Culture Links

French Language & Culture Links

Italian Language & Culture Links

German Language & Culture Links

Latin Language & Culture Links

ESL Links

Japanese Language & Culture Links

Foreign Language Teacher Resources

                                   

Back to Top

For all my Classes

 

Supplies Needed: A folder with loose-leaf paper, one subject notebook (not spiral), pen or pencil. Failure to bring these materials to class will lower a student's participation grade. A dry erase marker is helpful but not required. A French-English dictionary is also recommended. A Spanish-English dictionary for my Spanish classes.

Late Homework Policy: If an assignment is covered in class, it can no longer be handed in late. If I collect an assignment and do not go over it in class, it can be handed in until I return the assignments to the rest of the class, usually the next day. Otherwise, late work will only be accepted after a student has missed class due to a legal absence. If the student was in school on that day but was absent due to a field trip or music lesson, the work should be handed in on time. There may be special circumstances that arise during the year, these will be judged on an individual basis. It is the student's responsibility to keep up with their work and to know what needs to be done.

Making up work after an absence: Although I have no specific policy, I ask that you make up any work or take any quizzes or tests within a week after your return to school. If you wait longer, you may forget the material.

Notebooks:

1) All students are expected to have their French or Spanish notebooks with them every day.

2) Each day, students should put the date on the top of the page and take appropriate notes. If a student is absent, he or she is responsible for getting the notes for that day.

3) Each student is responsible for keeping any handouts, which are distributed in his or her French/ Spanish folder.

4) Any new material covered in the textbooks should be copied into notebooks. Students should do this in each chapter, regardless of whether it is assigned in class.

Attendance:

Attendance in a foreign language class is especially important since most of what a student learns will be from listening and speaking.

Classroom Expectations:

1) Think! Think and listen, listen and think.

2) Do your best.

3) Be prepared - Students are expected to bring all materials to class and take out their books, notebooks, pen or pencil as soon as they enter the room and sit at their desks.

4) Be on time to class (7th graders have five minutes after the bell.)

5) No food or drink in class. Gum is permitted unless it becomes a distraction.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Back to Top

FRENCH 1A & 1B-- Beginners French--Dr. Sikora

Course Description:

French 1A & 1B is a credit bearing, level one high school course.  Students will concentrate on the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will also be involved in the study of French culture, including sports, cuisine, songs, geography, etc.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be awarded one high school credit.  Students must pass the New York State Second Language Proficiency Exam (SLP--sometimes known as Checkpoint A) to receive credit.  If a student fails this exam, another course must be taken at the same level.  In order to continue in the honors program at the next language level, it is expected that the student will achieve and overall grade of 85 in both the exam and in the course as a whole.

Resources:

For more information on the Proficiency Exam and other New York State Dept. of Education resources on Languages Other Than English (LOTE) click on this link to my page on Foreign Language Teacher Resources & then click on Government & Standards.

Curriculum:

Students will be introduced to vocabulary, expressions, integrated with cultural topics.  Emphasis will be placed on practical ability to communicate.  Points of grammar will be woven into this communication-oriented approach.

The following thematic areas form the basic curriculum of the class:

Personal Identification

House and Home

Family Life

Education

Community and Neighborhood

Meal Taking, Food, and Drink

Shopping

Health and Welfare

Physical Environment

Earning a Living

Leisure

Public Services

Travel

 

Philosophy statement:

Teamwork/Partnership: Students, teachers, parents, and school administrators form a team that must work together for us to achieve the best possible results for all students.  Positive attitudes, behaviors, and outcomes are our goals as well as our expectation for all students.  All can achieve these goals.  We must communicate, find solutions, and help each other.   Students are expected to work with each other for daily practice outside of class and on a variety of projects in or out of class. 

Parent Connect:  Some information about assignments is now being made available via parent connections. My web site provides additional information, and will gradually be expanded to give access to many materials passed out in class.

For practice test please visit http://french.about.com/od/begtest/

Method of Contact: Messages can be left at the High School School.  (315) 435-4376

Extra Help:  Tuesday or Wednesday 2:00-2:45 Rm. 243. Available other days after school, upon request.  Feel free to talk to me about your needs or problems. 

Absence: All students are expected to obtain the names and numbers of at least a couple of their classmates so that if they are absent from class, they can call classmates to find out what was covered in class, what homework was assigned, and what else has been scheduled, such as a quiz.  In so far as the student has the materials in hand or can work with the classmate over the phone, they are expected to keep up.  See me upon return, or for absences of more than a couple of days, contact the school to have me send you more materials.  At some point in the future I hope to make many of the materials available through the web site. 

Homework:  Because Language is not just book knowledge, but also a performance- skill, daily review and practice of current vocabulary and expressions should be considered as homework every day.  Students are expected to practice outside of class with other students.  Written assignments will increase to reinforce the oral skills emphasized in class as we get into the school year.  Again, I hope to make many of the materials available through the web site. 

Quizzes, tests, and projects:  Students should expect a quiz on current vocabulary and expressions more or less on a weekly basis.  Larger, cumulative tests may be given from time to time.  Sometimes class projects or other work may be given in place of a quiz.  Some projects will require cooperative work with other students. 

Grading:  

            50% = Tests/Quizzes/Projects

            50% = Homework & Class Participation*

*Includes having materials open and ready, being prepared and able to answer questions, pronunciation, willingness to volunteer answers, cooperation in any classroom activities, effort, paying attention, good attendance and getting to class on time.  Disruptive behavior or need for frequent disciplining will impact negatively on the class participation grade.

Materials:

Texts

Other Materials

Discovering French, level one. Valette & Valette

C’est ton Tour—Aiming for Proficiency in French—workbook

Classroom handouts, projects

Binder or Notebook with pocket folders

Page Covers to cover some handouts

A dictionary is recommended

 

Back to Top

French I

French I is designed to be consistent with the foreign language curricula presented by the NYS Education Department. Successful completion of the course will require the acquisition of skills, knowledge and cultural insight as outlined for "Level One" (Checkpoint A) in the state curriculum. A local test will measure "Level One" proficiency at the end of the course. Successful completion of "Level One" is a requirement for enrollment in French II.

Textbook: Discovering French Bleu (1) - All books should be covered and treated with care since they are expensive. It is expected that students will bring textbooks to class each day unless otherwise informed by the teacher. Failure to bring textbooks to class will lower a student's participation grade.

Supplementary Materials: Workbook, transparencies, cassettes, scholastic magazines, videotapes, games, short stories, internet.

Scope of Course: This course is designed to provide students with a functional proficiency in French in the skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will be able to socialize, provide and obtain information, persuade and express feelings and emotions on the following topics: Socializing, exchanging information about themselves, counting, transportation, education, leisure, travel, telephone, house & home, family, professions, meal-taking, personal characteristics, community & neighborhood, health & welfare, shopping. This course is actually the second half of French I and will cover those topics which were not covered in eighth grade or will go more in depth on certain topics which require more work.

Level I students will review Chapters 8-16 in the textbook, adding new vocabulary and grammar to topics already covered. They will also cover the topics of shopping, health & welfare, community & neighborhood, travel & personal identification.

Grading:

Quizzes & Tests - may include compositions, dictations or speaking quizzes which count as 1/2 of a quiz grade, unit tests count twice

Homework - Homework is checked but usually not collected. Each homework assignment, which is satisfactorily completed, receives a 100%. If it is not completed or is unsatisfactory, it receives a 0%. Failure to complete homework may decrease the quarter grade as much as 5 pts., likewise completing homework will increase the quarter grade as much as 2 pts.

Participation - Includes being prepared for class, participating properly in pair or group work, speaking French as much as possible, and following classroom procedures. Correct participation may increase a quarter grade by as much as 2 pts. or incorrect participation may decrease it by 5 pts.

Final Evaluation: Local Exam - Students who score a 90 or above for the year will be exempt from the exam.

Back to Top

French II

French II is geared to the student who is able and eager to continue his or her study of the French language. In French II, basic communication skills are expanded with more sophisticated vocabulary and grammar. French II is designed to be consistent with Level II (Checkpoint B) of the State Curricula.

Textbook: Discovering French Bleu (1) and Blanc (2)- All books should be covered and treated with care since they are expensive. It is expected that students will bring textbooks to class each day unless otherwise informed by the teacher. Failure to bring textbooks to class will lower a student's participation grade.

Supplementary Materials: Workbook, transparencies, cassettes, scholastic magazines, videotapes, games, short stories, internet.

Scope of Course: This course is designed to provide students with a functional proficiency in French in the skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will be able to socialize, provide and obtain information, persuade and express feelings and emotions on the following topics: Socializing, exchanging information about themselves, counting, transportation, education, leisure, travel, telephone, house & home, family, professions, meal-taking, personal characteristics, community & neighborhood, health & welfare, shopping. This course is actually the second half of French I and will cover those topics which were not covered in eighth grade or will go more in depth on certain topics which require more work.

Level II students will cover Chapters 7-12 (chapters 8 & 12 are review units). Readings from Panorama books and Bonjour magazines will be used to supplement the text when a topic is not covered. Students should realize that next year they will take the NYS regents exam and should begin working towards satisfactory completion of that exam.

Grading:

Quizzes & Tests - may include compositions, dictations or speaking quizzes which count as 1/2 of a quiz grade, unit tests count twice

Homework - Homework is checked but usually not collected. Each homework assignment, which is satisfactorily completed, receives a 100%. If it is not completed or is unsatisfactory, it receives a 0%. Failure to complete homework may decrease the quarter grade as much as 25 pts.

Participation - Includes being prepared for class, participating properly in pair or group work, speaking French as much as possible, and following classroom procedures. Correct participation may increase a quarter grade by as much as 2 pts. or incorrect participation may decrease it by 5 pts.

Final Evaluation: District Wide Foreign Language Exam –

 

 

Back to Top

Lessons on Individual Topics

Here I have included lessons on a wide range of individual topics, a number of which are traditional for language and culture classes, and some of which belong more in the category now tagged "content" oriented (computer science, music, etc.). I may eventually move these to a page linked to this one to join the component breakdown of the whole courses listed above.


 

Alphabet Phonétique (with sound files)...link in boarder

Amiens Cathedral. A Multimedia Project for the Columbia University Core Curriculum

Les Animaux de la Ferme Lesson Plan

Un Arbre Généalogique

Les As du Tennis [pointers, lessons and quizzes]

CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE PARIS

Les Changements dans la société (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

LE CIRQUE: UNE SIMULATION GLOBALE

La Consommation et la cuisine (France) - with photos, exercises, sound, etc.

Core French - A Curriculum and Resource Guide for the Middle Level

Une courte leçon de relativité restreinte

Ecole Polyvalente des Hospitalières Saint Gervais (with small lessons on various subjects)

Les Ecoles (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

L'Europe [Civilisation Française] - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

Exercise de comparaison autour de quatre individus (TennesseeBob)

Les Fêtes et les traditions (France) - with photos, exercises, sound, etc.

French Lesson Plans (on specifc topics)

French Lesson Plans and Curricula

French 121.01 (Paulsen) - Project Options

L'Habitat - (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

L'Habitat intérieur (France) - with photos, exercises, sound, etc.

L'Héritage culturel (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

L'Histoire (France) - with photos, exercises, sound, etc.

International Phonetic Alphabet Chart

les journaux et les magazines

Leçon de géologie ...

Leçon de chasse

Petite Leçon de football américaine

Une Leçon de guitare, par Donald Loignon

Leçon de maquillage en 9 étapes (bal de fin d'études)

Une Leçon de perl

La Leçon de photo

La Leçon de photo: les photomontages

MANGEONS A PARIS!

Manger A Paris: Révision Arrondissements et Restaurants

LES MATHEMATIQUES (math ed site with problems and demonstrations)

Les méthodes d'analyse des circuits

Un Meurtre à Cinet (An E-mail Whodunit...)

Ministère des Affaires étrangères (exercise)

"Paris la Nuit"

Quia - French - top 20 Activities

Les Restaurants et la nourriture

SECONDAIRE 4 - FRANCAIS lecture

La Securité sociale (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

"Une Semaine à Paris"

"Les Sports à Paris (web lesson for French)"

Les Symboles (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

"Tante Mimi"

Le Tour de France 1999

Les Transports (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

Les Vacances (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

La Vie culturelle (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

La Vie économique (France) - with photos, exercises, sound, etc.

La Vie familiale (France) - with photos,exercises, sound, etc.

Voyageons en Côte d'Ivoire!

Voyageons en Haïti!

Voyageons en Madagascar!

Voyageons au Maroc!

Voyageons en Martinique!

Voyageons en Polynésie Française!

Voyageons en Tunisie!


Back to Top

Focused Topics Pages

This section, under vigorous construction, offers pages focused on particular topics. The "Grammar" page, will, for instance, present links to instructional documents or activities devoted generally to single grammar topics, such as verb tenses. There will also be pages on other language concerns, such as speaking, or cultural topics


 

Acquiring Vocabulary

French Grammar

Organizations Promoting the Study of French

Phonetics, Listening, Pronunciation and Conversation

Reading in French

Writing in French


Back to Top

Multi-functional Educational Sites in French

Activités pédagogiques en français (à télécharger pour PC et MAC)

Activities Integrated with Discovering French

Apprenez le français avec Internet

Bonjour de France (Apprentissage, Jeux)

CENTRE PEDAGOGIQUE (Le Quartier français du Village planétaire)

Civilisation Française

Culture Activities - QUIA

CyberScol

Démonstrations Orales de Pimsleur

Franco pour momes - Sites W3 educatifs recommandes par Edufrançais

French Language Tutor

French for all at ALL Levels Interactive Exercises (UK levels 7, 8, 9, GCSE, "A")

French Learning Website (activities)

French On-Line Courses (on how to use the internet to teach French)

A Guide to Intermediate French

Glencoe French Activities

L'Institut Canadien du Crédit Cours en français (under construction)

Pédegonet - Centre de ressources pédagogique

Recherche (robot chercheur dans les ressources didactiques du Ministère de l'Education du Québec)

Rescol canadien - Ressources pédagogiques

TEACHING WITH INTERNET FAQ (AATF)

Terminale exercises de lecture (GSCE and "A" Level in the UK)

Weavers French site (65 interactive exercises)

WEB ACTIVITIES FOR STUDENTS OF FRENCH

The WWW Notebook for Teachers of FRENCH (Sonja Moore, at VCU)

Back to Top

Welcome to Fast and Friendly French For Fun's Table of Contents.
If you'd like to take the "Guided Tour", click here.


 

Lessons:

dotLesson 1: Letters and Numbers

dotLesson 2: Gender and Articles

dotLesson 3: Subject Pronouns

dotLesson 4: Basic Verbs and Conjugations

dotLesson 5: Introduction to Regular Verbs

dotLesson 6: Adjectives

dotLesson 7: All Purpose Phrases

dotLesson 8: Going Further: Past and Future Tenses

dotLesson 9: 101 French Nouns, Verbs, and Adjectives

 

Eiffel Tower

 

Back to Top

French Lesson Plans

French Level 1 and above

·         French Castles on the Loire, Dennis Neuharth

·         La Polynesie Francaise, Melisa Salvato

·         Let's Go Shopping: 3 Suisses -

·         Top Ten Movies in Montreal , Nancy Salsig

·         Visite Virtuelle de Louvre , Gilbert Lanathoua

·         Le Temps en France , Rich Modica

·         Un Grand Magasin à Paris , Nancy J. Williams

·         A La Tele ,Ruby Brendlin

·         Le Tour du Monde Francophone , Tom Williams

·         Les Animaux de la Ferme , Sallie Nicholas

·         Museums, Museums, Museums! , Carol Parris and Julie Pinzás

·         Manger à Paris , Mme. Dawson

·         Le Shopping à Paris , Beryl Druker and Deborah Berg

·         Shopping in La Redoute Catalogue , Kathy Barton

·         Paris La Nuit , Linda Sacco

·         Le Monde Francophone, Karen Wilson

·         French Cheese, Jen Edick

French Level 2 and above

·         Vacances de ski , Candy Jester

·         Une Journée Typique? , Ginny Rossy

·         Trois Recettes de Trois Pays Francophones , Francine Shirvani

·         Patrick Bruel - French Singers , Françoise Boden

·         Un Arbre Généalogique , Nancy Bainter

·         Une Semaine à Paris , Francine Shirvani

·         Avez-vous faim? , Diane Anderson

·         l'Abbaye du Mont Saint Michel , Miriam de Schweinitz

French Level 3 and above

·         Une Visite a la Martinique , Dell-Louise Marsh and Richard Anderson

·         Tante Mimi - Leslie Long

·         Mangeons à Paris - Marni Geist

Back to Top

 

SECOND LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION

FRENCH, ITALIAN, AND SPANISH

 

When?

Proficiency Exams in all three languages are offered in June during Regents Exam Week.

Description of Exam: 

Part 1A:  Informal Speaking

Part 1B:  Formal Speaking

Part 2A:  Listening questions in English

10 points

 

20 points

 

10 points

 

Part 2B:  Listening questions in
 Target language

10 points

 

Part 2C:  Listening answer in pictures

10 points

 

Part 3:  Reading
              *6 realia with 
 questions in English
              *4 realia with
questions in Spanish

12 points
 8 points

 

Part 4:  Writing
2 notes 30 words

5 points
5 points

 

Total Points:

100 points

Back to Top

Part I: SPEAKING TEST (24 points)

Part 1a
(10 points)

*  Assessment of student performance in daily classroom activities from February 1 until five days prior to the date of the written exam.
A new
rubric has been designed to help teachers in the assessment of the students' performance.

Part 1b
(20 points)

*  Students must perform a total of four communication tasks randomly selected from a bank of 20 topics per communication function:  socializing, providing and obtaining information, expressing opinions or personal opinions, and persuading others to adopt a course of action.

 

*  Each task consists of a brief statement in English to indicate the purpose and the setting of the communication, the role of the teacher, and the person who is to initiate the conversation.

 

*  For each task, the student must complete four utterances or statements.  As the conversation partner, the teacher may make two attempts at eliciting each of the four student utterances.  If the student produces no comprehensible and appropriate utterance after the teacher's first two eliciting attempts at the beginning of the conversation, the student receives no credit for the entire task.  However, once the conversation has begun, if a student produces no comprehensible or appropriate response after the teacher's second eliciting attempt, the student merely receives no credit for that utterance.

 

*  The teacher gives a maximum of 5 credits for each task according to the following criteria:
      **Student receives 1 point for each of the four student utterances that are comprehensible and appropriate.
    ** Student is awarded 1 credit for the quality of all four comprehensible and appropriate student utterances. 
Quality means overall fluency, complexity, and accuracy within the scope of Checkpoint A proficiency statement in State syllabus.

 

SAMPLE TOPIC: 

[Student Initiates]  Teacher says:  I am your friend.  You have invited me to your home to watch television.  We will discuss which show to watch.  You start the conversation.

No Credit Responses:

*  yes/no responses
*  restatements of all or essential parts of what teacher has said.
*  proper names used in isolation
*  socializing devices (Hello, How are you, etc.) used in isolation.

Back to Top

PART II:  LISTENING COMPREHENSION (40 points)

Part 2a
20 points

*  10 short listening passages in the target language read by teacher with multiple choice questions in English.

Part 2b
10 points

*  5 short listening passages in the target language read by teacher with multiple choice questions in target language.

Part 2c
10 points

*  5 short listening passages in the target language read by teacher with questions in English and with multiple choice answers in picture format.

Back to Top

PART III:  READING TEST (20 points)

Part 3b
8 points

 

*  4 reading selections based on authentic material with multiple choice questions in the target language.

Part 3a
12 points

*  6 reading selections based on authentic material with multiple choice questions in English.

Word Count Guidelines

* Names of people and numbers (unless written out in words) do not count.

* Places and brand names from the target culture count; all other places (K-Mart) and brand names (Coke, Pepsi) are disregarded. 

* Contractions are one word.

*Salutations and closings in notes written in the target language are counted.  (There is no penalty if students do not use salutations or closings.)

*  Commonly used abbreviations in target language are counted.

  back to top

English

French

 

Italian

Spanish

New York City = 0 words

La Tour Eiffel = 3 words

La Eiffel Tower = 2 words

L'immeuble = 1 word

Les Galleries Lafayette = 3 words

J'ai = 1 word

 

Giuseppe = 0 words

Il Colosseo = 2 words

la Coca-Cola = 1 word

fare lo shopping = 3 words

all'una = 1 word

alle tre - 2 words

 

 

Nueva York = 2 words

La Universidad de Salamanca = 4 words

Juan = 0 words

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to Top

A Letter To The Parents

Of Blodgett Middle School

September 10, 2005

Dear Parent/Guardian:

We welcome you and your child to the foreign language experience at Blodgett. We are writing this letter in an effort to better inform you of the course implications and opportunities available to your child as related to foreign language study, and to the role the foreign language requirement plays in your child’s overall education.

All students at Blodgett will take Spanish in both 7th and 8th grades to meet the New York State mandate for foreign language study.  At Blodgett, we have formulated the foreign language program so that your child also has the unique opportunity, not only to meet the New York State mandate, but also to receive 1 (one) high school credit by the end of 8th grade.  (Please note:  the new high school graduation requirements in New York State include 1 unit of foreign language.)  We have redesigned the Spanish curriculum, ordinarily a ONE year program at the high school level, so that it is age-appropriate for middle school students and given over a period of TWO YEARS; Spanish 1A (7th grade)  and Spanish 1B (8th grade).  Students are taught in heterogeneously mixed classes, and all students may be eligible to receive 1(one) high school credit for Spanish 1.  High school credit, however, is NOT automatic.  To receive high school credit at Blodgett Middle School, your child MUST maintain a MINIMUM 65 average in the 8th grade portion of the course AND receive a MINIMUM grade of 65 on the New York State Proficiency Exam in Spanish given at the conclusion of 8th grade.

 What are the advantages of receiving high school credit in foreign language by the end of middle school?

1.   Your child receives 1 (one) Regents and/or high school credit toward graduation at SCSD (which is now required by the State of New York).

2.      Your child is eligible to continue the high school Regents sequence in Foreign Language beginning with French or Spanish 2 in his or her freshman year of high school.  He or she may complete the required sequence in his or her sophomore year, taking the New York State Regents exam upon the successful completion of French or Spanish 3.  This allows your child more choice in his or her junior and senior years to either continue the foreign language at a higher level OR take other high school electives.

3.      Most colleges and universities STRONGLY SUGGEST or REQUIRE at least 3 years of a foreign language for entry into their programs.  MANY colleges require foreign language study for graduation from their institutions, which may include high school study.  SOME “selective” colleges and universities suggest more than 3 years of foreign language study.  As a result of beginning in the middle school, your child will have a solid foundation upon which to build for any future foreign language study.

The foreign language program at Blodgett Middle School has been designed so that ALL students MAY be successful.  To ensure that your child WILL be successful, we ask that you:

1.      Check up on homework.  Please contact me, if necessary, by using the web link.

2.      Encourage your child to speak/orally practice the language at home.

3.      Encourage your child to participate orally in class.

4.      Check your child’s foreign language notebook periodically.  This should be kept for 2 YEARS to enable your child to study for the New York State Proficiency Exam at the culmination of 8th grade.

5.      Be sure that your child studies for quizzes and tests.

6.      Encourage your child to get extra help from her teacher, if he or she is having difficulty with the subject matter.

 

As a foreign language teacher, I would like to thank you, in advance, as partners in your child’s education, for your cooperation and assistance.  If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact your child’s foreign language teacher or guidance counselor.

                                                            Sincerely,

Dr. Gina Sikora.

 

Back to Top

COURSE/CURRICULUM SYLLABUS

 

PROGRAM AREA: FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

COURSE/CURRICULUM: SPANISH I

 

COURSE OUTLINE:

 

Unit 1: Personal Identification- Part I

 

In this unit, students will describe their biographical information such as: age, nationality and place of birth. Salutations/greetings, and expressions will also be introduced. Students will learn the alphabet and sounds. Students will engage in simple conversations.

 

Unit 2: Personal Identification- Part 2

Students will describe their physical and personality characteristics such as: facial features, body shape, and personality. The grammar includes an introduction to the verb “ser”. A suggested project is to create a collage of themselves using the target vocabulary.

 

Unit 3: Geography

 

Students win learn where the 20 Spanish-speaking countries/areas are located in the world, and their corresponding nationalities. They will also learn the Spanish spellings and pronunciations.

 

Unit 4: School/Education

 

In this unit, students will learn vocabulary associated with school such as: Subjects, supplies, and objects in the classroom. They will create a school schedule. The grammar covered in this unit includes: introduction of nouns/gender, descriptive adjectives, plurals of nouns and adjectives, the verb “hay”, and el/la/uno/una.

 

Unit 5: Weather/Calendar

 

Students will learn expressions associated with the weather and seasons such as:

Hace calor and la primavera. In addition, they will be introduced to conjugating verbs ending in “-ar” with the different pronouns.

 

Unit 6: Leisure/Free Time

 

In this unit, students will team vocabulary associated with leisure time such as: Days of the week, hobbies, sports, and other activities. Here they will team how to use the verb “gustar” (likes/dislikes), tell time, and conjugate regular verbs ending in ir and er.

 

Unit 7: Home/Family Life

 

Students will describe their home including words associated with types of rooms and some furnishings. They will also describe types of family members. The grammar covered is: “tener” and expressions, e-ie stem-changing verbs, and possessive adjectives. As a project, students will create a family tree.

 

Unit 8: Celebrations

 

In this unit, students will learn about festivals around the Spanish-speaking world. They will be able to describe what they are doing right now, using the present progressive.

 

Unit 9: Making Plans

 

Students will learn vocabulary associated with getting ready for an event, and making plans. They will read simple advertisements about events. In addition, they will learn the verb “ir”, simple future- ir + a + infinitive, and pensar (to plan).

 

Unit 10: Health and Welfare

 

In this unit, students will learn vocabulary associated with parts of the body, and describe how they feel. In conjunction, they will learn how to use the verb “doler” with indirect object pronouns, and “sentirse”, a reflexive verb.

 

Unit11: Meal Taking/Food/Drink

 

This unit will include vocabulary associated with types of food and drink, regional dishes, and utensils used for cooking. Students will read simple menus and create their own. Grammar consists of: Demonstrative Adjectives (este, esta), o-ue, and e-i stem-changing verbs.

 

Unit 12: Shopping

 

Students will learn vocabulary associated with shopping such as: Specialty shops, clothing items, and department stores. They will role play as a customer and salesperson, create a clothing catalogue, and also be able to describe locations of stores. The grammar consists of: “estar”, adverbs of location, comparatives-más/menos que, tan/como, and Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns.

 

Unit 13: Past Events

 

In this last unit, students will discuss/write about past events from this year. They will learn vocabulary associated with describing the past, such as: anteayer, ayer, anoche, anteanoche, and pasado. In conjunction, they will describe past events using the preterite tense of regular verbs ending in ar, er, and ir, and the preterite of the verb ir.

 

Unit 14: Review for Final Exam

 

This unit is a review for the final exam. It includes an overview of verb tenses, and any grammar points that students request to review. Class activities may include: Individual practices, pair work, practice tests, and review games.

 


Back to Top

Lesson Plans:

Spanish Level 1 and above

·         Latinos en los EEUU Gabriela Garger

·         Tortillas vs. Tortillas Valerie Hecht

·         ¡Vamos a Granada!, Kristy Cross

·         Medios de Transporte en Cuba, Valerie Hecht

·         De Vacaciones en Bariloche, Richard Freeman

·         Hotels in Acapulco, Sue Guenette

·         La Familia Real, Kathleen Jacobs

·         Una Visita al Zoo de Madrid, Susan Erdman

·         Muralism, Muralists, and Murals, Carol Sparks

·         El Ballet Folklórico de México, Carol Sparks

·         El Museo del Prado, Pilar Agudelo

·         El Tiempo en la América del Sur, Martha Dratsioti

·         El Bosque Lluvioso, Carol Sparks

·         Cuentos, Carol Sparks

·         El Fútbol Femenino en España, Siobhan Williams

·         La Perla , Fremont High School Teachers

·         Presentaciones de las Danzas en la Ciudad de México , Carol Sparks

·         Excursiones en México, Cristian Alvarez

·         El Tiempo en Chile, Linda Miele

·         Honduras: A Cultural Lesson in English, Carol Sparks

·         El Mundo Maya, Carol Sparks

·         Puerto Rico , Carol Sparks

·         Fiestas en Peru , Linda Amour

·         Folk Dances in Spanish Speaking Countries , Gloria Ulloa Rodriguez

·         Los Volcanes Mexicanos , Gail Saucedo

·         De Vacaciones en Buenos Aires , Lewis Johnson

·         Chocolate - The Food of the Gods, Gail Saucedo

·         What "El Chupacabras" means to me!!! , Diane Rosner

·         Museums, Museums, Museums! ,Carol Parris and Julie Pinzas

·         Alicate , Carol Sparks

·         La Cocina de México, Carol Sparks

·         Los Próximos Conciertos en Madrid, Carol Sparks

·         El Calendario de Danzas Folklóricas Mexicanas , Carol Sparks

Back to Top

Spanish Level 2 and above

·         Ir de Compras por el Internet, Francisca Camargo

·         El Día de los Muertos, Gilberto Moreno

·         Mi niñez, Marcelo Leal

·         Las Reglas de Tráfico en Uruguay, Rosemary Soares

·         La Familia Real, Filomena Rocha

·         Un Museo Virtual , Felipe Dobarganes

·         Recetas en Español , Carol Hoffman

·         La Tele Madrileña en la Red, Walter Jansen

·         Diego Rivera , Lynn Tracadas

·         Los Trenes de España , Greg Eichler

·         Deportes en España , Linda Amour

·         Artistas Mexicanos , Josei Roguero

·         La Liga Mexicana de Béisbol , Joanne Atkin

·         Venta y Compra de Vehículos , Virginia Blankenship

·         Un Muralista Mexicano , Guadalupe Diaz

·         Los Números de los Mayas , Maggie Elliott

·         Visita al Zoológico, Dawne Ashton

Back to Top

Spanish Level 3 and above

·         Breve historia de España, Miguel Hernandez

·         Comida Mexicana, Adriana Rentería

·         Comida, Renato Martinez

·         Museo el Prado, Renato Martinez

·         Frida Kahlo, Renato Martinez

·         Periódicos, Renato Martinez

·         Música, Renato Martinez

·         Personajes: Salvador Allende, Renato Martinez

·         Metro de Madrid, Renato Martinez

·         El Surrealismo, Wanda Snow

·         El Día de las Madres , Isabel Vasquez

·         Tapas , Carol Pomares

·         "El Velorio" by Francisco Oller , Maritza Salguiero-Carlisle

·         Culture of Spain , Becky Walleen and Andrea Roberds

·         Las Líneas de Nasca , Heddy Olivos

·         Dos Fiestas , Sandra Mack

Back to Top

Spanish Level 4 and above

·         Los Desaparecidos de Chile, Gabriela Ibarra-Estrada

·         La Batalla de Puebla (Cinco de Mayo), Sharon McKinney

·         El Día de los Muertos en Michoacán, Mexico, Miguel Leyto

·         Frida Kahlo y Ana María Matute , Elsa Danner

·         Jorge Luis Borges and His Work , Jairo Jimenez

·         La Nutrición - Span. for Span. speakers, Gloria Ulloa Rodriguez

·         El Museo del Prado , Kathleen Hagey

·         La Lengua de las Jarchas , Julian Randolph

·         El Prado , Dawne Ashton

Back to Top

Unit Plan

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1:  Las Clases

 

Introduction

 

     El aprendizaje de cualquier lengua extranjera conlleva varios aspectos importantes a los que el estudiante debe ser expuesto. No es un secreto que para  alcanzar el éxito en la adquisicion de cualquierlengua dos”, el aprendiz logrará mejores resultados si aplica la regla de que “a mayor exposición mejor adquisición”. El estudiante debe sumergirse todo lo que pueda en el contexto del idioma que quiera adquirir. Debe  olvidarse asimismo de barreras culturales y diferencias étnicas. Debe estar dispuesto a experimentar la cultura y lengua que haya decidido aprender. Debe empezar por querersobrevivir” en dicho contexto. Es importantísimo también que el estudiante pueda escoger maestros que realmente entiendan la importancia de crear un ambiente adecuado para que el aprendiz se sienta cómodo durante la adquisición de los nuevos términos.  El alumno necesita de un instructor que deje fuera de su salón de clase la idea de memorización de conceptos para ser evaluados en quizes y exámenes únicamente. Un instructor que deje fuera de los límites del salón la idea de “clase magistral” y que permita al estudiante desarrollarse no solo individualmente sino junto con sus compañeros en actividades amenas, grupales y que reflegen los conceptos que se esten aprendiendo en la clase. Un instructor que entienda que debe evalúar a sus estudiantes en diferentes actividades y con diferentes rubros de evaluación (no sólo los matemáticos). Una vez que existan los elementos adecuados (el estudiante con una buena actitud de aprender y el maestro con una buena actitud de enseñar) y los principios de enseñanza bien definidos es cuando, entonces y sólo entonces, el ambiente será propicio para la adquisición adecuada del segundo idioma. Con base en los términos antes mencionados y teniendo en cuenta que para aprender un idioma se deben ir abarcandolas partes” con la finalidad de alcanzar el “todoes que esta unidad está basada en el objetivo de llegar a manejar los conceptos relacionados al salón de clase y sus contornos.

 

Description of course

Este curso de español uno es impartido para estudiantes de octavo año de la escuela media del lugar y es un requisito para el  colegio o “highschool”.  Esta es una clase diaria de cincuenta minutos cada una.  Se estudiará la Unidad 1, Lecciones 1, 2 y 3. El tema de esta unidad será el salón de clase, las materias o cursos escolares y las actividades favoritas.  Se hará énfasis en producción oral y auditiva, el uso de algunas formas gramaticales,  la pronunciación de algunas letras, el conocimiento de algunas historias propias de la cultura hispana, y el uso de algunas estrategias de lectura y escritura

 

Bibliographic information for textbook

 

En Español McDougal Littell, 2004

 Purposes and goals to be addressed

 

Al finalizar esta unidad, el estudiante será capaz de incorporar a su vocabulario todo lo concerniente al salón de clase. Será capaz de entender y comunicar a otrosconceptos como cuántos/as, muchos/as, etc. El alumno describirá oralmente y por escrito la clase y sus objetos, usará números hasta el 100, hablará y escribirá de su horario, expresará gustos y disgustos. Podrá escribir y hablar del significado y uso de verbos como hay, tener, gustar. También escribirá y hablará de la cultura hispana, usará algunas  estrategias de lectura y escritura.

 

Standards to be addressed

 

Person-to-Person Communication: Strands 1 and 2. Students will exchange simple spoken and written information in Spanish and he/she will demonstrate skills necessary to sustain brief oral and written exchanges in Spanish using familiar phrases and sentences.

 

Listening and Reading for Understanding: Strands 3 and 4.  The student will understand simple spoken and written Spanish based on familiar topics that are presented through a variety of media and he/she will use verbal and non-verbal cues to understand simple spoken and written messages in Spanish.

 

Oral and Written Presentation: Strands 5 and 6.  The student will present orally and in writing information in Spanish that contains a variety of familiar vocabulary, phrases, and  structural patterns and he/she will present rehearsed material in Spanish, including brief narratives, monologues, dialogues, poetry, and/or songs.

 

Cultural Perspectives, Practices, and Products: Strands 7 and 8.  The student will develop an awareness of perspectives, practices, and products of Spanish-speaking cultures.  He/She will recognize that perspectives, practices, and products of Spanish-speaking cultures are interrelated.

 

Making Connections through Language: Strand 9.  The student will recognize how information acquired in the study of Spanish and information acquired in other subjects reinforce one another. 

 

Cultural and Linguistic Comparisons: Strand 10.  The student will demonstrate an understanding of the significance of culture through comparisons between Spanish-speaking cultures and the cultures of the United States.

 

Communication across Communities: Strand 12.  The student will identify situations in which Spanish language skills and cultural knowledge may be applied beyond the classroom setting for recreational, educational, and occupational purposes.

 

Context of the unit

 

La unidad se desarrolla bajo el contexto de la clase y sus alrededores (cursos o materias y actividades favoritas).

 

Objectives (“Progress Indicators”) stated in terms of observable  behavior

 

El estudiante será capaz de:

 

Describir oralmente y por escrito el salón de clase y los objetos en ella.

 

Usar números hasta el 100.

 

Preguntar y hablar sobre cantidades utilizando ¿cuántos/as. . .?, muchos/as, hay uno/a.

 

Decir no en Español.

 

Hablar y escribir del horario de clase.

 

Hablar y escribir de las clases que esta tomando.

 

Decir y escribir la hora.

 

Hablar y escribir de cuando algo empieza y termina.

 

Expresar gustos y disgustos.

 

Preguntar y describir lo que a otros les gusta.

 

Decir y escribir cuando algún evento toma lugar.

 

Asociar actividades con los meses del año.

 

Content, skills and knowledge needed (vocabulary, grammar, culture . . .)

 

El estudiante será capaz de comprender, escribir y hablar de los siguientes conceptos:

 

Vocabulario: Objetos en la clase, números hasta el 100, materias/cursos en la escuela,         expresiones de tiempo, meses del año, y actividades favoritas.

 

Gramática:  La forma verbal hay, la palabra no, el verbo tener, decir la hora, el verbo gustar.

 

Pronunciación:  Hacer énfasis en la pronunciación de las letras s, z, h, y j.

 

Cultura:  Jaime Escalante (maestro de matemática en un colegio marginal en el este de Los Angeles), el uso de uniformes escolares en los países que hablan español, uso de realia (la television en español, revista en español), las nacionalidades y grupos étnicos en el mundo de habla hispana.

 

Lectura y estrategias:  Leer Los Tres Zapatos usando la estrategia de “relajarse cuando se lee en español. Leer ¿Quién es el genio? y Carta de una amiga mexicana usando la estrategia de reconocer cognados.

 

Escritura: describir dos maestros/as.

 

Instructional strategies, activities, procedures

 

El estudiante sera capaz de demostrar la adquisición de  conceptos a traves de las siguientes estratégias, actividades y procedimientos:

 

TPR: Póngase de pie, ahora siéntese, caminen, etc.

 

Picture File: los dibujos deben estar bien enfocados a algo en particular, debe ser interesante y que llame la atención del estudiante, suficientemente grande para que sea visible a todos los estudiantes.

 

Pre-text Oral  Activities:  El tiempo de atención para estudiantes de escuela media oscila entre 5 a 10 minutos. Cambios frecuentes de actividades de TPR son importantes para mantener la atención de los muchachos.

 

Transparencies: Importantes para visualizar conceptos con los estudiantes.

 

Student-centered input: ¿Quién es la estudiante de pelo rubio largo? Juana.

                                          ¿Cómo te llamas?,  etc.

 

Either/or Questions:  ¿Son dos o tres?, ¿Es blanca o roja?, etc.

 

Dialogues: en donde la memorización no sea la meta principal sino más bien la “superviviencia” en el lenguage dos.

 

Affective activities:  Opiniones del estudiante, gustos, experiencias, etc.

 

Realia-Based Activities:  Revistas, periódicos auténticos.

 

Matching Activities: Aparear conceptos.

 

Resources and materials such as transparencies, items for games and activities, handouts

 

El estudiante utilizará en su proceso de aprendizaje los siguientes recursos y materiales:

Videos, realia, transparencias, cartas de lotería, juego de memoria, prácticas escritas y orales, cuadro de extra puntos, actividades de “info-gap”, revistas, periódicos, maestra de habla hispana.

 

Assessment instruments and materials

 

El estudiante será evaluado de la siguiente forma: desarrollo académico durante actividades, participación oral por medio del cuadro de extra puntos, tareas, exámenes y quizzes.

 

Bibliography of sources used

 

  1. Robbins, Elaine. Discovering Languages Spanish. Amsco School Publications, INC.

 

  1. Sheeran, Joan G. Exploring Spanish.  Second Edition Revised. EMC Corporation, 2002.

 

  1. Downs, Cynthia. Spanish Elementary.  Carson-Dellosa Publishing Company, Inc. 2002.

 

  1. Peródico La Nación. San José, Costa Rica.

 

Individual lesson plans and materials    

Attached.

 

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 1

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

(50 minutos)

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 1: Las Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

Materials: Picture file, libro de trabajo, libro de texto transparencias 25 y 26.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

        

            (Strands 1, 3, Interpretive/Presentational)

 

  1. identificar y describir los objetos que se encuentran en el salón de clase.

 

  1. reconocer los números hasta el 100 cuando los escuche.

 

(Strands 3, 4, 5, Interpersonal, Presentational)

 

  1. saludar y contestar en español a un compañero de clase.

 

  1. usar hay, cuántos, cuántas, muchos/as, uno/a en preguntas y respuestas.

 

  1. enumerar los objetos que hay en el salón de clase.

 

  1. comunicar a otro estudiante cuántos objetos hay en la clase.

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

1.      Warm-up/repaso de saludos, la fecha, el tiempo, la hora (utilizando interacción entre los estudiantes). (2 minutos)

 

2.      Usando la transparencia 26, decir en voz alta (varias veces) los objetos de la clase y los números del 40 al 100. Repetir. Modelar la pregunta ¿Qué hay en el salón de clase? y dar respuesta. (4 minutos)

 

3.      ¿Cuántos/cuántas(nombre del objeto) hay en la clase? Explicar que cuántos se usa con sujetos masculinos y cuántas con femeninos. Señalar a los objetos y preguntar a los estudiantes cuál palabra se debe usar.  (4 minutos)

 

  1. Tomar el rol de maestro y utilizar las mismas preguntas. El estudiante que conteste a la pregunta será el siguiente “maestro”.  (5 minutos)

 

  1. Jugar Simón dice: muéstrenme el libro, señalen la pizarra, toquen, caminen, abran/cierren, escriban con, levanten,  etc. (5 minutos)

 

  1. Revisar la lista de vocabulario. Marcar las palabras que ya sabes. Trabajar con un compañero y buscar en el diccionario del libro las palabras restantes asignadas por la profesora. Prepararse para explicar al resto de la clase (sin utilizar palabras en ingles) el significado de su(s) palabra(s). (10 minutos)

 

  1. Trabajar en práctica escrita (llenar un crucigrama con los objetos de clase, escribir los números de teléfono al estilo hispano y utilizando palabras, y encontrar y decir oralmente en una revista hispana las páginas en donde se encuentran algunos de sus artículos)  y luego revisar oralmente con la maestra (15 minutos)

 

  1. Tarea: Estudiar los objetos de clase y números de la práctica anterior. Quiz mañana.

 

  1. Warm-down: repasar las preguntas claves de esta lección: ¿Hay pupitres en esta clase?, ¿Cuántas ventanas hay?, ¿Es un sacapuntas o una bandera? Y despedidas.

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

         No hubo tiempo de terminar la actividad 7 en claseLos estudiantes deberán terminar las páginas asignadas de tarea y estudiarlas para mañana.

 

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 2

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 1: Las Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

Materials: Picture File, libro de trabajo, libro de texto transparencias 25 y 26.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

        (Strand 1, Interpersonal)

 

1.      saludar y responder a un compañero.

 

  1. responder a preguntas afirmativas o negativas con los objetos de clase.

 

  1. preguntar y responder la fecha, el clima, y la hora.

 

(Strands 3, 5, 9, Interpretive, Presentational)

 

  1. reconocer  y nombrar los objetos de la clase.

 

  1. contar números del 40 al 100.

 

(Strands 5, 6, Presentational)

 

  1. participar de un diálogo corto e improvisado utilizando saludos, despedidaspreguntas y respuestas estudiadas durante esta lección.

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/repaso de saludos, fecha, clima, hora y objetos de clase. Preguntar a los estudiantes . . . ¿Cuántos carteles, calendarios, escritorios, etc hay en la clase? (5 minutos)

 

2.      Tomar un quicito corto sobre objetos de la clase (específicamente los de las páginas 41-42 del libro de trabajo) (5 minutos)

 

  1. Trabajar en pareja en una actividad de aprendizaje cooperativo llamada ¿ o No? Por turnos los estudiantes preguntarán y responderán. Anotarán las respuestas del compañero. (5 minutos)

 

  1. Trabaja con tus compañeros asignados. La maestra dará al grupo de estudiantes papelitos con instrucciones usando la siguiente información: Reproduce your Spanish class. One of you will be the teacher and the other two will be the students. Do what you regularly do in your Spanish class, greet students, ask for the date (today, tomorrow, yesterday), ask for the weather or ask your students to talk about the weather, the time. Include the new questions and answers about classroom objects (how many . . .?).  Be creative and funny. Don’t forget to farewell your students.  Be ready, groups will be called randomly. Los estudiantes se prepararán para decir su diólogo en frente del grupo. Algunos grupos no serán llamados pero todos deben estar listos. (15/20 minutos)

 

  1. JugarMinilotería”.  Llenar los tableros de lotería con números del 40 al 100, así como lo explican las instrucciones en el juego. Tache los números que tenga cuando estos sean llamados. (10 minutos)

           

  1.  Warm-down: Pedir a los estudiantes que empaquen sus cosas. Usarmandatos” con objetos de la clase. Por ejemplo; muéstrenme un lápiz, señalen la pizarra, levanten un libro, etc.   (5 minutos o hasta que la campana suene), despedidas.

 

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

No hubo tiempo para jugar lotería. Los estudiantes quisieron presentar su diálogo a la clase. Fueron sólo cinco grupos.

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 3

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 1: Las Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

 

Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

  1. Preguntar a los compañeros de clase cuántas cosas hay y responder apropiadamente.

 

  1. Preguntar a los compañeros de clase cuántas cosas hay de cada objeto y responder con un número.

 

  1. Tomar el papel de la maestra y reproducir la rutina diaria al principio de la clase usando los conceptos aprendidos hasta ahora (saludos, fecha, clima, tiempo, objetos de la clase).

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/Routina (lo mismo que hemos estado haciendo en las 2 últimas clases)(5 minutos).

 

  1. Setup: hacer preguntas para ampliar el contexto de hay.  Por ejemplo:  ¿Qué hay en tu mochila?, ¿Hay bolígrafos?, ¿Cuántos bolígrafos hay? (2 minutos)

 

  1. Escribir ¿Cuántos  hay? subrayandoos en cuántos. Dar después, ejemplos femeninos:  Hay faldas muy bonitas en la clase de hoy. ¿Cuántas faldas hay?      (2 minutos)

 

  1. Escribir ¿Cuántas hay? with a line under –as.  Seguidamente, usar nombres de objetos o personas en la clase para introducir el uso de los números con ¿Cuántas hay? Por ejemplo: ¿Hay una persona que lleva chaqueta? , hay una; ¿Cuántas personas llevan jeans? Una, dos . . . (4 minutos)

 

  1. Escribir Hay uno; Hay una; hay (cualquier números en la pizarra). Explicar que hay se usa con un solo número. (2 minutos)

 

  1. Dar ejemplos con muchos/as: ¿Hay muchos carteles en esta clase?, Hay también muchas ventanas, ¿verdad?.  Escribir hay muchos y  hay muchas en la pizarra, subrayandoos/-as. (2 minutos)

 

  1. Hacer preguntas con respuestas negativas como por ejemplo: ¿Hay muchas puertas en esta clase? No, no hay muchas.  ¿Hay muchos relojes? No, no hay muchos. (4 minutos)

 

  1. Hacer ejercicio 1 oralmente: Practicar preguntas y respuestas con cuántos/cuántas y muchos/as. Repasar “agreement”. (4 minutos)

 

  1. Hacer ejercicio 2 oralmente para practicar cuántos/as y hay uno/a. Recordar a los estudiantes que cuántos/as o uno/a deben concordar con los objetos de los que uno esta hablandoPedir a los estudiantes observar la transparencia 28: Miren el escritorio de Roberto.  Hay muchas cosas en su escritorio ¿verdad? ¿Hay bolígrafos? y,  ¿cuántos bolígrafos hay?, ¿Hay uno?, ¿Hay dos? Leer el modelo 3 o 4 veces, cada vez substituya un objeto nuevo para asegurarse que los estudiantes estan entendiendo que deben escoger entre el masculino y el femenino uno y una. Dejar que sean los estudiantes los que pregunten y contesten los ejercicios. (5 minutos).

 

  1. Tarea: Trabajar en el libro de trabajo, página 45.  Escribir y estar listo a decir mañana cuántas cosas hay en el salón de la clase de matemáticas.  Traer tarea firmada por los papás. Ganarán extra puntos. (5 minutos)

 

  1. Warm-down: Hacer preguntas utilizando lo estudiado en clase. Por ejemplo: ¿Cuántos estudiantes llevan pantalones azules, lentes de sol? ¿cuántos lápices tienes en tu mochila?, etc.

 

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

No se tomó tanto tiempo para el warm-down.

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 4

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 1: Las Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

                                                   

Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

  1. Preguntar a los compañeros de clase cuántas cosas hay y responder apropiadamente.

 

  1. Preguntar a los compañeros de clase cuántas cosas hay de cada objeto y responder con un número.

 

  1. Tomar el papel de la maestra y reproducir la rutina diaria al principio de la clase usando los conceptos aprendidos hasta ahora (saludos, fecha, clima, tiempo, objetos de la clase).

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/Routina (lo mismo que hemos estado haciendo en las 2 últimas clases)(5 minutos).

 

  1. Mirar el video de la lección 1. Preguntar a los alumnos por cuantas cosas observaron en el video y si observaron X objeto con el fin de que ellos respondan con no, no hay plantas en la clase de la señora Ortíz. (5 minutos)

 

  1. La maestra preguntará: ¿Hay un teléfono en la clase? y ella misma responderá y escribirá en la pizarraNo, no hay.  Entonces pedirá a un estudiante leer sección A en voz alta (otros ejemplos con oraciones negativas). La maestra repasará con sus estudiantes lo aprendido en lecciones anteriores, como por ejemplo, Pedro, ¿estás enfermo, contento, aburrido? Y Pedro responderá No, no estoy enfermo, contento, aburrido, etc. La maestra preguntará a sus estudiantes cosas incorrectas: ¿te llamas Tomás? Escribe en la pizarra mientras dices, No, no te llamas Tomás. Enfatiza que se dice no antes del verbo para hacerlo negativo. En respuestas, la gente a menudo usa no dos veces. Un estudiante leerá sección B. Señalar que la construcción con no tiene varios equivalentes en inglés, como por ejemplo don’t, doesn’t, and isn’t. (10 minutos)

 

  1. Escribe No, no hay and No, no lleva . . . en la pizarra antes de hacer el próximo ejercicioRecuerde a los estudiantes que el primer no es solamente una respuesta de conversación y no necesariamente una oración negativa. (2 minutos)

 

  1. Utilizando la transparencia 29, los estudiantes practicarán oralmente las oraciones negativas. De acuerdo al dibujo, tu compañero leerá la oración y dirás que no y corregirás la oración con la información correcta. Por ejemplo:

-         compañero: Paco lleva una camiseta verde.

-                      No, Paco no lleva una camiseta verdeLleva una azul.

             (5 minutos)

 

  1. Pide a los estudiantes que escriban seis oraciones negativas sobre la ropa que llevan hoyPor ejemplo: Hoy no llevo pantalones azules. Llevo pantalones negros. Por turnos, algunos de los estudiantes leerán sus oraciones al resto de la clase. (10 minutos)

 

  1. Repasa los números del 0 al 40.  Pide a estudiantes voluntarios decir en voz alta los números de 10 en 10 hasta 40. Entonces repasa , hay . . . / No, no hay . . . con los objetos que los alumnos ya conocen.  (5 minutos)

 

  1. De acuerdo al dibujo contesta la pregunta con hechos reales.   Pregunta a los estudiantes la primera oración, después de esto, los alumnos preguntarán y contestarán en pares. Por ejemplo: ¿Hay 40 estados en los Estados Unidos? No, no hay cuarenta estados.  Hay cincuenta. ¿Hay 12 minutos en una hora? No, no hay 12. Hay 60. (5 minutos)

 

  1. Tarea: Repasa conceptos estudiados hasta ahora en la lección 1. Examencito corto mañana. Repasa objetos de clase, números 0-100, el verbo hay, y las oraciones negativas.

 

  1. Warm-down: Pedir a los estudiantes que empaquen y repasar conceptos como: ¿cuántas plantas hay en la clase? No, hay, hay seis, etc.  ¿Hay 40 ventanas en la clase de español? No, no hay 40. Hay 10. ¿cuántas chicas llevan faldas en la clase? . . . hasta que la campana suene y haz las despedidas. (5 minutos)

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

Hay algunos estudiantes que, me parece, necesitan un poco más de práctica escrita durante la lección. Me da la impresión de que necesitan visualizar por escrito lo que estamos aprendiendo.

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 5

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 1: Las Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

                                                   Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12  Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

  1. Leer y discutir con sus compañeros acerca de Jaime Escalante Los Tres Zapatos.
  2. Leer superficialmente (skim) para encontrar información importante acerca de la lectura.
  3. Observar dibujos, cuadros, texto para encontrar infomación en forma de figuras o cognados que les ayude a entender el tema de la lectura.

 

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/Routina (lo mismo que hemos estado haciendo en las últimas clases).  Hacer preguntas claves que vienen en el examencito a continuación para encuestar si los estudiantes saben sus conceptos.   (5 minutos).

 

  1. Los estudiantes tomarán un examencito corto con los conceptos estudiados hasta ahora. (20 minutos)

 

  1. La maestra dice: Miren la foto. ¿Es un hombre o una mujer? ¿Cómo es? ¿Cómo se llama este hombre? Los estudiantes leerán en voz alta y por turnos (voluntarios) el párrafo. Al mismo tiempo uno o dos estudiantes escribirán en la pizarra los cognados que encontremos en cada oración. Cuando terminemos la lectura, la maestra dirá: ¿Quién es Jaime Escalante? Es un profesor muy famoso, ¿verdad? ¿Es profesor de ciencias o profesor de matemáticas? ¿Conocen ustedes la película  Stand and Deliver?

(10 minutos)

 

  1. Pide a los estudiantes leer de nuevo el párrafo. Esta vez solo con la vista. La maestra entonces pregunta: ¿Cómo se llama el progama de television del señor Escalante? ¿Quiénes son sus invitados famosos? ¿Es interesante, el programa del Señor Escalante? ¿Es divertido? Y las matemáticas, ¿son importantes o no? ¿A quién le gusta mirar el programa “Futures”? ¿A quién le gusta estudiar? (10 minutos)

 

  1. TareaLeer en la página 66 del libro de texto “reading tip 1” y leer superficialmente (skim) Los Tres Zapatos. Busca y escribe los cognados que encuentres.

 

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

Ninguna crítica. El tiempo fue suficiente para hacer todas las actividades. Me sentí un poco agotada con mi voz, especialmente después de estar hablando a mis estudiantes durante seis períodos.

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 6

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

 

Date:

 

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 1: Las Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

 

Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12  Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

 Leer y discutir con sus compañeros acerca de Jaime Escalante Los Tres Zapatos.

  1. Leer superficialmente (skim) para encontrar información importante acerca de la lectura.
  2. Observar dibujos, cuadros, texto para encontrar infomación en forma de figuras o cognados que les ayude a entender el tema de la lectura.

 

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/Routina (lo mismo que hemos estado haciendo en las últimas clases).  Hacer preguntas claves que vienen en el examencito a continuación para encuestar si los estudiantes saben sus conceptos.   (5 minutos).

 

  1. Jugar lotería para repasar números del 40 al 100. (10 minutos)

 

  1. Releer en clase “Tip 1” para refrescar conceptos. Estudiantes (por turnos) escribirán en la pizarra los cognados que encontraron cuando hicieron la tarea. Pedir a los estudiantes que miren la transparencia 27 y decir: Juana tiene un problema ¿verdad? Y, ¿qué problema tiene? Su cuarto está muy desordenado. ¿Es éste un problema típico de los adolescentes? ¿Qué son adolescentes? ¿Ustedes son adolescentes? . . . , ustedes son adolescentes. Y yo ¿soy una adolescente? No, yo no soy una adolescente. Soy una adulta, ¿verdad? . . . Bueno, un problema típico de los adolescentes es un cuarto con cosas por todas partes (utilizar gestos para expresar el concepto por todas partes). Los profesores también tenemos este problema. señor . . qué barbaridad! Y . . . ¿tienes este problema? ¿Cristina?, ¿Jaime?, ¿Hay muchas cosas en tu cuarto?¿Sí?¿Qué cosas hay? Obtenga varias respuestas. Aliente a los estudiantes a que usen vocabulario que ya conocen pero también introduzca nuevo vocabulario como latas de refresco, una lámpara, animales de felpa, cassettes. Se debe tratar de promover la idea general de mantener el buen humor sobre un escritorios y cuartos desordenados. Mantener la actividad con un movimiento rápido.  (10 minutos)

 

  1. Para la primera lectura del texto, lea el primer párrafo en voz alta y los estudiantes seguirán la lectura. Explicar a los estudiantes que (1) no deben traducir al inglés y (2) no tienen que entender cada palabra para obtener la idea general.  Enfatizar palabras claves, exagerar la entonación, y usar gestos para aclarar significado. Hacer preguntas de contenido, como por ejemplo: ¿Qué hora es? ¿Dónde está Juana? ¿Cómo está Juana hoy? Seguir el mismo procedimiento para los siguientes párrafos y el diálogo. Hacer pausas para hacer comentarios y preguntas durante y después de la lectura.  (10 minutos)

 

  1. Los estudiantes leerán una vez más y en silencio la lectura. Después que hayan terminado, pedir voluntarios para decir en voz alta el diálogo. Usar la técnica de “lea, mire hacia delante y diga” (5 minutos)

 

  1. Los estudiantes completarán oralmente con la palabra correcta, las oraciones que estan en la página sesenta y ocho del libro de texto. (2 minutos)

 

  1. Para escuchar la pronunciación de las letras s y z, los estudiantes escucharán el cassette y pronunciarán la rima varias veces (Estos ojitos tan azulitos se duermen bien. ¡Te-rén-ten-ten!). Repetir la actividad en grupos de dos o tres. Dar mérito a los estudiantes que mejor lo hagan. (5 minutos

 

  1. Tarea: Hacer en casa la actividad ¿Qué ideas captaste? con respecto a la lectura estudiada en clase.

 

  1. Warm-down: Llamar a estudiantes que quieran decir la rima de memoria. Hacer preguntas que se hayan hecho en clase hoy (cuantos/as, quién es Escalante, etc) y despedidas. (5 minutos)

 

 

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

Hubo poco tiempo para decir la rima. A los estudiantes les emociona el repetir este tipo de rimas. No alcanzó el tiempo para todos los participantes.

 

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 7

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 2: El Horario de Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12  Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

 

  1. Hablar y escribir sobre las materias de la escuela.

 

  1. Hablar y escribir acerca de la vida escolar en los países hispanos.

 

  1. Reconocer los cognados para entender un texto simple sin el uso del diccionario.

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/Rutina: Dejar que un estudiante voluntariamente introduzca la clase de la misma forma que lo hace su maestra. El estudiante saludará, preguntará la fecha de hoy, mañana y ayer, preguntará la hora, y ¿cuántos/as mapas hay en la clase?.  (5 minutos)

 

  1. Mirar el video de la lección anterior. Pedir a los estudiantes decir en voz alta las palabras conocidas que escucharon. Observar otra vez el video. Dar a los estudiantes el diálogo incompleto y pedirles que escriban las palabras o frases que hacen falta. (10 minutos)

 

 

  1. Mostrar a los estudiantes las fotografías para esta lección. Presentar a los estudiantes de las fotos diciendo: Estos son Francisco y Leticia, son estudiantes en el colegio (escribir colegio = high school en la pizarra) Benito Juárez en la Ciudad de México. ¿Dónde esta México?(señalando el mapa mundial). Pedir a algún voluntario buscar el lugar. ¿Dónde esta la Ciudad de México? La ciudad de México es la capital de México.  Mostrar otra de las fotografías: Humberto y Carolina son de San Juan, Puerto Rico. ¿Dónde está Puerto Rico? Y ¿San Juan?. Mostrar las otras dos fotografias con estudiantes de España y la boleta de calificaciones con los libros de textos. Hablar un poco de esto también.                (10 minutos)

 

  1. Después de explicar las fotografías dejar que los estudiantes escuchen los diálogos del cassette, que corresponden a cada una de las fotografías.  Los estudiantes leerán el diálogo en voz baja mientras lo escuchan. Hacerles preguntas para comprobar que los entendieronHacer pausa en cada diálogo para hacer preguntas. Los estudiantes escucharán las tres descripcionesFinalmente dejar que algunos voluntarios repitan los diálogos con alguno de sus compañeros.      (10 minutos)

 

  1. Dar a los alumnos una lista de vocabulario útil para esta lección: las clases, los lugares, los sustantivos, los adjetivosBuscar los cognados primero (álgebra, arte, geografía, historia, gimnasio, lóquer, la computadora, el programa, etc). Luego los estudiantes serán divididos en grupos de tres o cuatro. Se les dará un grupo de palabras para buscar en el diccionarioCuando cada grupo sepa los significados de las palabras asignadas, jugaráncharadas” sin utilizar palabras en inglés.      (15 minutos)

 

  1. Tarea: Usando una palabra de cada columna de palabras, escribe y describe tus siete clases.

 

  1. Warm-down/Cierre: Brevemente repasar lo aprendido hoy diciendo; Tu clase favorita es . . . el siguiente estudiante no puede repetir la misma clase. Tiene que mencionar alguna otra. Despedida.

 

 

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

No tuvimos suficiente tiempo para terminar lascharadas”. Talvez se hubiera podido cortar un poco las preguntas de los diálogos en el cassette.

 

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 8

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 2: El Horario de Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12   Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

 

  1. Hablar y escribir sobre los horarios de clase y sus materias.

 

  1. Hablar y escribir acerca de la vida escolar en los países hispanos.

 

  1. Utilizar en forma escrita y oral la forma verbal tener, decir y escribir la hora usando menos, cuarto, y media; usar familiarmente la pregunta ¿a qué hora?, a la(s) . . .

 

  1. Reconocer los cognados para entender un texto simple sin el uso del diccionario.

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/Rutina: Dejar que un estudiante voluntariamente introduzca la clase de la misma forma que lo hace su maestra. El estudiante saludará, preguntará la fecha de hoy, mañana y ayer, preguntará la hora, y ¿cuántos/as mapas hay en la clase?, ¿qué ropa llevas?, Simón dice señalen, toquen, levanten (cualquier objeto de clase). . .            (5 minutos)

 

  1. Escribir categories en la pizarra y pedir que los estudiantes las copien dejando espacio para sus respuestasEscribir, por ejemplo, 3 clases interesantes, 3 cosas en el salón de clase, 3 cosas en una tienda de ropa para mujer, 2 días de la semana, un color interesante, un número entre 50 y 100, 3 cosas en un lóquer típico en la escuela. Dejar que alumnos voluntarios vengan a la pizarra a escribir sus respuestas. (10 minutos)

 

  1. Utilizando la transparencia 30, hacer preguntas como: ¿Quién tiene una clase de álgebra?, ¿es difícil o fácil la clase de inglés?, ¿qué clase tiene Ernesto a las once menos diez?, ¿cómo es la clase de . . . ?, ¿A qué hora tienes la clase de .?, hacer notar que cuando la pregunta empieza con a que hora, la respuesta también debe empezar con a la(s) . . .     (5 minutos)

 

  1. Utilizando la información de un cuadro (nombres de alumnos, materias y adjetivos) el alumno preguntará y contestará de la siguiente manera: ¿Quién tiene una clase de . . . (muy) difícil?, ¿Cómo es la clase del señor . . . ? y la señora Ramírez, ¿cómo es ella?      (5 minutos)

 

  1. Revisar oralmente las oraciones que los estudiantes escribieron en su tarea sobre sus clases de la escuela.  (5 minutos)

 

  1. Dar a los estudiantes un horario sin información. Ellos escribirán en español las clases que tienen este año. (10 minutos)

 

  1. Utilizando el cassette, los estudiantes escucharán un diálogo entre dos estudiantes. Ellos se preguntan ¿qué materias tienes este año? Tengo . . .  ,  ¿cuál es tu material favoritaY ¿cómo es tu clase de . . . ?. Escucharán el diálogo varias veces y luego en pares, se harán las mismas preguntas utilizando información real.

 

  1. Tarea: Repasar vocabulario. Quicito mañana.

 

  1. Warm-down: repasar los conceptos estudiados el día de hoy. Despedidas.

 

 

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

Muchas actividades. Se tuvo que eliminar la actividad #4.

 

 

Back to Top

Daily Lesson Plan 9

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 2:  El Horario de Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

 

Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos:  Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12   Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

 

  1. Hablar y escribir sobre los horarios de clase y sus materias.

 

  1. Utilizar en forma escrita y oral la forma verbal tener, decir y escribir la hora usando menos, cuarto, y media; usar familiarmente la pregunta ¿a qué hora?, a la(s) . . .

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up: Hacer brevemente la rutina y después dejar que los estudiantes hagan la actividad llamada Minidetective: Las clasesSe les dará a los estudiantes una lista con cuatro clases diferentes y se les pedirá que circulen alrededor de la clase preguntándoles a sus compañeros ¿es álgebra (ciencias, inglés, etc) tu clase favorita?, cuando encuentren a alguien cuya clase favorita está en su lista, ellos deben escribir el nombre del estudiante en el espacio en blanco.  (5 minutos)

 

  1. Los estudiantes tomarán un quicito corto de vocabulario: Parte A: La hora. La maestra dirá una hora específica y el estudiante marcará el reloj que tiene dicho tiempo. Habrá cuatro relojes con diferente horasParte B: Categorías.   El estudiante circulará la palabra que no pertenezca a la categoría, por ejemplo; los lugares:  la cafeteria, la ciudad, el día, el gimnasio.  Habrán seis de estos ejercicios.           (10 minutos)

 

  1. Introducir oralmente el verbo TENER usando los objetos de la claseTomar un lápiz y decir: ¿qué es esto? ¿qué tengo? ¿es un bolígrafo o un lápiz? , es un lápiz. Y ustedes, levanten sus lápicesExcelente! Yo tengo un lápiz, tienes un lápiz, ella tiene un lápiz y él tiene un lápiz también. Escribir en la pizarra las diferentes conjugaciones del verbo tener: yo tengo, tienes, usted tiene, y él/ella tieneJuan, ¿cuántas clases tienes?, yo tengo cuatro clases. ¿qué clases tienes?              (5 minutos)

 

  1. Bien muchachos y muchachas, habran el libro en la página 86, ejercicio 1. Leer el diálogo en voz alta y estudiantes voluntarios suplirán la forma del verbo tener que haga falta. Los estudiantes leerán el diálogo en parejas usando la técnica “lea, mire hacia arriba y diga”.  (10 minutos)

 

  1. Repasar la concordancia del género diciendo y escribiendo en la pizarra; tengo un bolígrafo. Tengo uno.  Tengo una falda roja. Tengo una. Tienes muchos papeles. Tienes muchos.   Tienes muchas fotos. Tienes muchas.  Ahora en pareja, los estudiantes harán preguntas a su compañero de lo que tienen en su cuarto y en su lóque/casilleroPor ejemplo: ¿tienes fotos de tu novio/a? , tengo una, un cuaderno amarillo, carteles, un gato o un perro, libros, etc.          (10 minutos)

 

  1. Usando el reloj de juguete y el reloj de la clase, practica la expresión ¿A qué hora . . .? , usar la transparencia con el horario de clases y hacer preguntas utilizando menos, cuarto, y media; ¿qué clase tiene Luis a las once y cuarto?, etc. Asegurárse por medio de ejemplos en la pizarra, que los estudiantes entiendan la diferencia entre y y menos. Escribir cuarto = quince, media = treinta. Enfatizar que si la pregunta dice ¿A qué hora tienes . . .? la respuesta empezará también con a las 4:50.  Hacer oralmente el ejercicio 3 del libro de texto con los estudiantesUtilizando la información dada, ellos preguntarán y darán la hora correcta. Por ejemplo; Víctor, ¿qué hora es?  Son las ocho y veinte. (7 minutos)

 

  1. Tarea: Responde con si o no si tienes las prendas de ropa mencionadas en tu práctica. Luego hazle las mismas preguntas a tu amigo. Parte 2: Usando el horario de clase de Felicia, responde a las preguntas. Escribe tus respuestas en la hoja de trabajo.

 

  1. Warm-down:  Preguntar a los alumnos ¿qué clase tienes ahora? (la siguiente clase).  Despedida.

 

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

Trabajando sin perder un solo minuto, si se cubren todas las actividades. Aún así, me siento bastante exahusta. Talvez sería mejor eliminar alguna.

Back to Top

 Daily Lesson Plan 10

 

Spanish 1-Middle School-7th Graders

 

 

Date:

Level: Spanish 1, Unidad 1, Lección 2: El Horario de Clases    

National Standards: (National: 1.1, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 4.1, 4.2)

Materials: Picture file, workbook, textbook and transparencies 25, 26 y 29.

 

Objetivos: Los alumnos podrán:

 

(Strands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12   Interpretive/Interpersonal/Presentational)

 

  1. Repasar escrita y oralmente objetos de clase y el concepto de cantidad.

 

  1. Preguntar y responder de manera oral y escrita por la hora.

 

  1. Preguntar y responder escrita y oralmente ¿a qué hora tienes/empieza/termina la clase de . . . ?

 

  1. Hablar y escribir sobre los horarios de clase y sus materias.

 

  1. Hablar y escribir acerca de la vida escolar en los países hispanos.

 

  1. Utilizar en forma escrita y oral las formas tengo, tienes, tiene.

 

  1. Decir y escribir la hora usando menos, cuarto, y media.

 

 

Procedimientos/Actividades:

 

  1. Warm-up/Rutina: Dejar que un estudiante voluntariamente introduzca la clase de la misma forma que lo hace su maestra. El estudiante saludará, preguntará la fecha de hoy, mañana y ayer, preguntará la hora, y ¿A qué hora tienes ciencias?, ¿cuántos/as mapas hay en la clase?.  Luego los estudiantes jugarán al Minidetective: La escuela curiosa.  Cada estudiante tendrá una lista con cuatro objetos de la clase cuya cantidad deben buscar. En la misma lista el estudiante tendrá un quinto objeto con la cantidad. Por ejemplo: hay 92 banderas en el salón de clase y tienes que encontrar cuántos bolígrafos, calendarios, carteles y relojes hay.  Los estudiantes circularán alrededor de la clase preguntando ¿Cuántos (bolígrafos, calendarios, etc) hay en la clase? Cuando encuentren al estudiante que tiene la cantidad, deben escribir la cantidad en su lista. (10 minutos)

 

  1. Repasar brevemente el decir la hora usando menos, cuarto y mediaHacer oral rápidamente los ejercicios 3 y 4 en el libro de texto. Por ejemplo: Victor, ¿qué hora es?  Son las ocho menos veinte.  Son las doce y cuarto en Buenos Aires. ¿Qué hora es en Los Angeles? Son las tres y media. Utilizar un horario y un mapa y señalar los diferentes lugares para que los estudiantes sepan adonde se encuentran.    (10 minutos)   

 

  1. Escribir la expression ¿A qué hora (tienes/empieza/termina) . . . ? en la pizarra. Recordarles a los estudiantes que deben usar a al principio de sus respuestas. Leer los ejemplos que vienen en el libro de texto. Preguntar luego a algunos estudiantes para expandir el concepto y , ¿a qué hora tienes la clase de matemáticas? ¿a qué hora empieza?, ¿a qué hora termina?.  Hacer oralmente el ejercicio 5 en el libro de texto usando la transparencia del horario de Patricia.  (5 minutos)

 

  1.  Los estudiantes escucharán un diálogo entre los estudiantes Mariana Peña y Humberto García en San Juan, Puerto Rico. La maestra preguntará que entendieron y escribirá en la pizarra palabras claves y detalles de lo que pasa en el diálogoUna vez que los estudiantes más o menos saben de lo que se trata la conversación, la maestra les dará una hoja de trabajo en donde ellos marcarán los gustos y lo que no le gusta a Humberto.  (10 minutos)

 

  1. Los estudiantes verán un video sobre los saludos y las despedidas en diferentes lugares. Mirarán el video sin sonido primero. Hablarán de lo que ellos creen esta pasando en el video. Verán el video ahora con sonido. Hablarán de lo que se trata el video. La maestra les entregará una hoja de trabajo para que marquen con una “x” los saludos y despedidas que oyen en la escena 1, y escena 2. También deducirán el significado de la frase vamos caminando. En la escena 3 marcarán los saludos y despedidas que oyen y deducir que quiere decir la palabra llave (se les dará tres opciones).   (10 minutos)

 

  1. Tarea: Repasar conceptos gramaticales: las conjugaciones del verbo tener, expresar la hora con cuarto, menos, media. Saber la diferencia entre ¿qué hora es? y ¿a qué hora tienes/ termina/ empieza . . . ?Examencito mañana.

 

  1. Warm-down:  Haciendo notar la diferencia de saludar y despedirse de la gente de habla hispana (hombres: dándose un apretón de manos, mujeres y mujeres a hombres o hombres a mujeres: tocándose ligeramente las mejillas, mejilla contra mejilla), pedir a estudiantes voluntarios levantarse y saludarse o despedirse.        (5 minutos)

 

(Teacher’s critique of this lesson plan):

Tiempo para todas las actividades muy apretado, acortar algunas actividades para la próxima vez. Talvez no gastar tanto tiempo dándo explicaciones.

 

 

Practicum Students:  METHODS AND

MATERIALS in FOREIGN LANGUAGES
SPRING 2006, SUNY-Oswego
 
Course Outcomes:
Students will be able to:
1. Identify, examine, explain, analyze and apply the theories underlying current pedagogical approaches to foreign language instruction and current issues and polemics.
2. Collect, create and adapt instructional materials appropriate to junior high and senior high school foreign language courses.
3. Prepare and implement individual lesson plans, a unit plan, authentic and traditional assessments, text book evaluation, technology integration and classroom management.
4. Prepare for a successful student teaching experience.

Course Requirements:

Attendance and active participation at every class meeting are essential.

Students will subscribe to FLTEACH Listserv throughout the semester.  A summary of a recent thread will be submitted in writing by April 21.

Students will investigate topics about which they, as classroom teachers, will need to make decisions informed by research and guided by common sense.  Students will complete two guided studies.  These study guides will be due on March 26 and April 7.

Students will write learning objectives and develop activity plans and assessments due February 21, 28; March 9, 23 and 30.  Each student will develop a long-range unit plan, which will incorporate these lesson plans previously described. Due May 2.

Students will develop a resource file of instructional materials appropriate to both middle school and senior high school foreign language courses.  In addition, students will organize a three-ring reference notebook of reference materials, handouts and activity ideas.  Due Monday, April 4.

Students will attend a professional foreign language meeting or conference and will submit a 1 page written report.  Due Monday, March 7.  Students are encouraged to join at least one professional organization.

There will be several short quizzes given on assigned reading material and class discussions.
Required Reading:

NY State Education Department.  1986.  Modern Languages for Communication:  New York  State Syllabus.

NY State Education Department.  1996.  Learning Standards for Languages Other Than English (LOTE).

New York State Proficiency and Regents Examinations:  Instructor's Manuals. (download list)

Heller, Bill.  1999.  "Developing Curriculum for LOTE Standard 2,"  in Vogely, Anita.  Foreign Languages On The Threshold of Tomorrow. (handout)

LeLoup, Jean and Robert Ponterio.  2000.  "Creating Standards-based Activities Integrating Authentic Materials from the World Wide Web."  in Heller, Bill.  ABC to Ph.D -Foreign Language Proficiency for All. (handout)

Recommended Readings:

Omaggio-Hadley, Alice.  2001   Teaching Language in Context, Third Edition.

Koch, April.  1988.  Creative and Communicative Homework.  Hispania  71:3, 699-704.

Kopper, Karen.   1989.  Techniques and Strategies for Successful Classroom Management:  Observations from the Trenches.  In A.G. Ramírez.  From Ideas to Action:  An Agenda for the 90's.  NYSAFLT Annual Meeting Series  6: 49-57.

LeLoup, Jean.  "Taller hispano' (available online at FLTEACH) or
Ponterio, Robert.  "Civilisation française' (available online at FLTEACH)

EXPECTATIONS:

This course is an important part of your professional formation.  The highest level of personal responsibility, integrity and commitment will be expected regarding all aspects of this course.  Therefore, based upon this high standard of professionalism, the following policies are stated:

Punctuality.  The class will begin promptly at 6:00.  Count on the entire class period being utilized.

Responsibility.  Late assignments will result in a 20% penalty if turned in at the next class meeting. Assignments not turned in at the following class will not be accepted.

Scholarship.  All assignments, with the exception of the mid-term and final examinations, should be typed and printed.  It is expected that all documents, which are handed in will have been carefully proofread for typographic, orthographic and grammatical errors.  In addition, all works, including activities used in activity plans, which are copied from textbooks, must be properly cited. Plagiarism must be avoided in accordance with SUNY College at Oswego policy.

Courtesy.  Please leave all cell phones turned off during the entire class period.  If you bring coffee or soda to class, please clean up your own mess.  Please do not close notebooks or pack belongings until the professor has ended the class.

Attendance.  Attendance is expected at every class meeting as outlined in the course syllabus.  Copying class notes in insufficient to make up for having missed an entire class.  In addition to having missed the class, the class will have lost out on your contribution to the development of the topic.  Students are responsible for any announcements or assignments given during a missed class and arrangements must be made to hand in any assignments, which are due before the end of that class that day.  If quizzes are missed, the professor reserves the right to make up an alternative assessment of the material.  Make-up quizzes must be taken during office hours or after class.

Preparation.  Please bring necessary materials to class as listed in the weekly course syllabus.  Students are expected to be able to participate based upon having completed assigned readings prior to the class meeting.

Evaluation:
Assignments, Study Guides and Lesson Plans

40%

 Showcase Unit

15%

Resource Notebook 

15%

Midterm Exam and Two Quizzes 

20%

Final Exam 

 10%


Grading:
 
95-  100 A
90 - 94 A -
86 - 89 B +
83 - 85 B
80 - 82 B -
77 - 79 C +
74 - 76 C
70 - 73 C -
60 - 69 D
0   - 59 E


  CLASS ASSIGNMENTS

1. Join FLTEACH.  Follow one strand.  Report of Findings. Due: March 21

2. Two Study Guides.   Due: January 26 and February 7

3. Summary of NYSAFLT Buffalo Regional Due: March 7

4. Sponge Activity Demonstration and Handout, due: April 18

ACTIVITY PLANS

Students will develop learning activities, lesson plans and a unit plan.

Five lesson or activity plans will be appropriate for each of the Checkpoints B of the New York State Syllabus.

1. Vocabulary Activity Plan, February 21
2. Reading Activity Plan, February 28
3. Speaking Activity Plan March 9
4. Grammar Lesson Plan, March 23

5. Culture Lesson Plan March 30

Each plan should include the following (minimally):  learning objective; learning standard(s); materials needed; anticipatory set; body of lesson broken into steps; closure; evaluation of learning; adjustment for students with special needs, adjustment to other levels. (Based on information presented at Feb. 7 and Feb.9 classes)

STUDY GUIDES

Students will complete two major guided studies.

1. Standards and Syllabus Documents January 26
2. Terms and Issues February 7

RESOURCE FILE

The resource file is a collection of resources which can be used in the foreign language classroom.  The file may include both student-produced and commercially produced materials.
The File will consist of a box of file folders and one or two three ring binders.
Due: Monday, April 4

It should include, but is not limited to:


Files should include resources for teaching grammar, vocabulary and culture.
Files should include resources for instructional levels 7-12.
Files should reflect the NYS Syllabus.
Files should be organized for efficient use and retrieval of materials.
Evaluation will be based on variety, quality, quantity, appropriateness, and organization.
Course materials and handouts should NOT be included in the resource file.

SHOWCASE UNIT PLAN
Each student will develop a long-range Checkpoint B unit plan, which may incorporate one of the lesson plans previously described. Due May 5
• Unit plan should include the four language skills, culture, grammar and vocabulary.
• Unit plan should incorporate each of the NYS LOTE standards.
• At least one lesson should make use of "new" technology.
• Unit plan covers 15 teaching days (including assessments)

ALTERNATIVE ASSIGNMENT FOR PROFESSIONAL MEETING:

If you are unable to attend the NYSAFLT Buffalo Regional on March 5, should complete an annotated bibliography of 25 websites useful for foreign language teachers.  One copy of this bibliography should be turned in on March 7. In addition, copies of the bibliography should be made for the rest of the members of the class and distributed at the March 7 class.

USEFUL BOOKMARKS

FLTEACH:   http://www.cortland.edu/flteach

Foreign Language Learning Standards:  http://edstandards.org/Standards.html

Spanish:  Eva Easton's Site   http://eleaston.com/spanish.html

French:  Tennessee Bob's Site    http://www.utm.edu/departments/french/french.html

Foreign Language Teachers' Guide to Learning Disabilities http://www.fln.vcu.edu/ld/ld.html
National Center for Education Statistics http://www.nces.ed.gov/
National K-12 Foreign Language Resource Center http://www.educ.iastate.edu/nflrc/
Foreign Language Lesson Plans and Resources for Teachers http://www.csun.edu/~hcedu013/eslsp.html

The National Capital Language Resource Center http://www.nclrc.org/
Teacher Resources for Instructional Planning http://tripforteachers.org/ForeignLang.html
 
DOWNLOAD LIST
Note: Most of the downloads listed here are in .pdf file format.  That means you need Adobe Acrobat Reader on the machine you use to open and print the files.  Adobe Acrobat Reader is available as a free download for Macs or PCs at many websites, which have pdf files.

Required Downloads (Print, punch and put in a three ring binder.)

Standards for Foreign Language Learning: Executive Summary.  1996.  ACTFL Executive Summary.  http://www.actfl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?page id=3324   (Download execsumm.pdf)

http://www.longwood.edu/staff/goetzla/span400/Iglesias/UnitPlan.htm#Lesson%203

http://www.nysedregents.org/testing/slpexams.html  (Download June 2004 test, teacher dictation and scoring key for either French or Spanish SL Proficiency Exam)

http:/www.nysedregents.org/testing/hsregents.html   (Download June 2004 test, teacher dictation and scoring key for either French or Spanish Regents Exam)

http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/pub/publote.html (Download LOTE Checkpoint C Resource Guide)
  Helpful Downloads

http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/osa/hslote.html New York State Proficiency and Regents Examinations:  Instructor's Manuals. (Download SLP Exam Changes & Sampler Sections 1 & 2 and Comprehensive Regents Examination – Overview and New Speaking Samples and Anchor Papers for French or Spanish)

Hand in Hand   http://www.learnnc.org/DPI/instserv.nsf/Category 9   (Click on "Strategies," then click on "Instructional Strategies from Hand in Hand")

Nebraska Frameworks http://www.nde.state.ne.us/FORLG/Frameworks/FrameworksMain.htm (Click on "Frameworks Document")

http://www.longwood.edu/staff/goetzla/span400/Holliday/articles.htm


Recommended Supplies: (Make pilgrimage to Staples, Wal-Mart or Office Max)

1.  Several reams of printer paper.
2.  One extra printer ink cartridge
3.  Two large three ring binders - one for Resource File and one for Class handouts and notes.
4.  Box of file folders.  (letter size)
5.  Portable plastic file box.  (letter size)
6.  Index cards